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Palatable Palatalization. A Story of Each, Much, Such, and Which in Middle English Dialects

$17.99$35.99

Agnieszka Kocel

 

Æ Academic Publishing

The book originated in need for a palatable explanation to one of the most influential processes in the English phonology. The author shows the true character of palatalization, examining its effects exerted on four high-frequency words: EACH, MUCH, SUCH and WHICH.

$44.99 $17.99
$35.99

Description

The concept of palatalization has always intrigued linguists trying to find a palatable explanation for one of the most influential processes in the English phonology.  Having initiated in Old English, palatalization took Middle English by storm, introducing a variety of forms, some of which have survived well into our modern times.  Contrary to the popular belief, however, the process itself was far from palatable, proving lack of consistency observed across different dialects of that period.  The present monograph intends to show the true, both palatable and unpalatable, character of palatalization, examining its effects exerted on four high-frequency words: EACH, MUCH, SUCH and WHICH, all of which appear copiously in the texts of the Innsbruck Prose Corpus.  The monograph thus aims to analyze the extent of phonological inhomogeneity from the point of view of lexical diffusion, which demonstrates the impossibility to establish any definitive dialectal boundaries underlining the existence of a [k]-dialect and, consequently, the everlasting idea of the north-south divide.

Additional information

Author

Agnieszka Kocel

Series

Warsaw Studies in English Historical Linguistics

Series Vol.

WSEHL VI

Editor

Jerzy Wełna

Publisher

Edition

1st

ISBN

978-0-9961021-1-7, 978-1-68346-116-6

Pages

295

Binding

perfect bound with gate-folds

Size

14cm x 21.5cm

Weight

0.36 kg

Table of Contents

ChapterPage
List of Figuresxi
List of Tablesxiii
Preface xvii
Abbreviationsxix
1 Introduction
1.1 Introductory remarks1
1.2 Terminology1
1.2.1 Palatalization as a phonological process5
1.2.2 Palatalization in Middle English7
1.2.3 Palatalization-related controversies12
1.3 Aims of the study14
1.4 Lemmas15
1.5 Temporal frames21
1.6 Dialectal frames22
1.7 Corpora23
1.8 Selection of texts24
1.9 Methodology of research25
1.10 Lexical diffusion and dialect contact28
1.11 Summary35
2. The North and Scotland
2.0 Introductory remarks37
2.1 Textual material39
2.2 Homogeneous texts with either palatalized or non-palatalized forms42
2.3 Heterogeneous texts with both palatalized and non-palatalized form45
2.4 Conclusions62
3. The East Midlands
3.0 Introductory remarks65
3.1. Textual material67
3.2. Homogeneous texts with either palatalized or non-palatalized forms71
3.3 Heterogeneous texts with both palatalized and non-palatalized forms75
3.4 Conclusions108
4 London
4.0 Introductory remarks111
4.1 Textual material114
4.2 Homogeneous texts with palatalized forms118
4.3 Heterogeneous texts with both palatalized and non-palatalized forms120
4.4 Conclusions131
5 The West Midlands
5.0 Introductory remarks133
5.1 Textual material134
5.2 Homogeneous texts with palatalized forms137
5.3 Heterogeneous texts with both palatalized and non-palatalized forms139
5.4 Conclusions142
6. The Minority Dialects
6.0 Introductory remarks145
6.1 Textual material147
6.2 Homogeneous texts with palatalized forms151
6.3 Heterogeneous texts with both palatalized and non-palatalized forms153
6.4 Conclusions158
7 Non-localizable Texts
7.0 Introductory remarks161
7.1 Textual material162
7.2 Homogeneous texts with either palatalized or non-palatalized forms166
7.3 Heterogeneous texts with both palatalized and non-palatalized forms169
7.4 Conclusions199
8 Conclusions
8.0 Introductory remarks201
8.1 Homogeneity and heterogeneity of texts201
8.2 Lemmas most and least susceptible to palatalization202
8.3 Most frequent palatalized and non-palatalized forms203
8.4 Palatalized and non-palatalized forms on the maps in LALME and LAEME204
8.5 Predominance of palatalized or non-palatalized forms untypical of a dialect204
8.6 Distribution of palatalized and non-palatalized forms across dialects205
8.7 Percentage of texts defying regularity of palatalization206
8.8 Non-localizable texts208
8.9 Final conclusions209
References211
Appendix 1 Palatalization consistent texts227
Table A.1 The distribution of non-palatalized forms in texts with words entirely unaffected by the k-palatalization process (Chapter Two)227
Table A.2 The distribution of palatalized forms in texts with words entirely affected by the k-palatalization process (Chapter Three)229
Table A.3 The distribution of palatalized forms in texts with words entirely affected by the k-palatalization process (Chapter Four)235
Table A.4 The distribution of palatalized forms in texts with words entirely affected by the k-palatalization process (Chapter Five)243
Table A.5 The distribution of palatalized forms in texts with words entirely affected by the k-palatalization process (Chapter Six)248
Table A.6 The distribution of palatalized forms in texts with words entirely affected by the k-palatalization process (Chapter Seven)253
Appendix 2 LALME forms263
Index 271

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